Tuesday, June 07, 2005

Amnesty International: Nothing New Here

Not to be a killjoy, but Amnesty International has been peddling it's anti-Americanism since the outbreak of the Iraq war in 2003. That April their website proclaimed: "Iraq: Fear of War Crimes By Both Sides." The "war crime" Amnesty International feared from the United States? The coalition's targeting of one of Saddam's state-run TV stations. Said AI's Claudio Cordone, "The bombing of a television station simply because it is being used for purposes of propaganda is unacceptable."

That AI release about the "war crimes" being comitted by both sides spent five paragraphs on American "attrocities" and four sentences denouncing Iraq actions (which included shelling civilians and having Iraqi soldiers dressing in civilian clothes in order to carry out surprise attacks).


Aaron Hanscom said...
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Aaron Hanscom said...

Ann Bayefsky took the ACLU to task in yesterday's NRO. A highlight:

At Durban, Amnesty led the international NGO assault on universal standards. According to Khan, what mattered were “the voices of the victims.” In her words, “The victims of racism and related intolerance have described their own realities of racism and related intolerance as they experience it…This Declaration and Programme of Action is an inclusive text which enables our various perspectives to be presented at the World Conference.”

However, despite the rhetoric of “inclusiveness,” the Amnesty International chief sat on her hands when a motion to delete the voices of Jewish victims of racism was put to the vote and adopted. Every Jewish NGO from around the world walked out. Amnesty and company stayed.

Bizarro Jack said...

What are the official rules about how bad a journalist you can be before you get bombed? Come on, don't be so jaded to people dying. You'll stand up for 17 year old murderers and rapists (as perhaps you should) but not broadcasters' right to live, based on who writes their checks?

I'll be honest, I dont know how big the bombs were or how many people died. The propaganda machine, while it was quite laughable here, it was less laughable there, and it was appropriate for it to be destroyed, and when I say propaganda machine, I am talking about antennas. I just don't like the attitude of disregard.